TEPHRA SEISMITES

Evaluating earthquake hazards using liquefied volcanic-ash layers in lakes

Lake Ngaroto (photo by F van Schie)

Latest Updates

Tehnuka invited as ECR plenary speaker at IAVCEI 2023 volcanology conference in Rotorua

We are glad to announce that Tehnuka, who is a postdoc in our Tephra-Seismites group, will give an Early-Career Researcher Plenary talk at the volcanology conference of the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth’s Interior (IAVCEI) 30 Jan-3 Feb 2023. Although she is currently working with tephras, Tehnuka’s main research area until … Continue reading Tehnuka invited as ECR plenary speaker at IAVCEI 2023 volcanology conference in Rotorua

Liquefaction structures in Lake Rotoroa (Hamilton Lake)

M.Sc. student Richard Melchert has worked for the Tephra-Seismites group since mid 2021 and assisted with lake coring, sediment description, and other laboratory work. In his recently submitted dissertation entitled “Sedimentology and characterisation of soft-sediment deformation structures within lacustrine successions in 20,400-year-old Lake Rotoroa, Hamilton, New Zealand”, he studied liquefaction structures in Lake Rotoroa, which … Continue reading Liquefaction structures in Lake Rotoroa (Hamilton Lake)

Field and lab update

The Tephra Seismites have had a particularly busy couple of months. Our coring fieldwork was completed in September, with cores collected from six further lakes. We have since completed X-ray Computer Tomography (CT) scans of all these new cores. Over the past few weeks, we cut, opened, and described all remaining cores from both of … Continue reading Field and lab update

Project Summary

Liquefied volcanic-ash layers (‘tephra seismites’) preserved in lake sediments have never been reported. In northern New Zealand we have identified at least four such seismites in tephra-bearing lakes aged ~20,000 years in the Hamilton Basin. Our aim is to use this unique opportunity to develop a novel methodology to evaluate the frequency, possible magnitude, and likely locations of major earthquakes for the past 20,000 years in the basin. Click here to continue