TEPHRA SEISMITES

Evaluating earthquake hazards using liquefied volcanic-ash layers in lakes

Lake Ngaroto (photo by F van Schie)

Latest Updates

PhD position available with the Tephra Seismites team

We are looking for a doctoral student to join our team, for a project on characterising and using liquefied lacustrine tephra layers to evaluate paleoearthquakes and seismic hazard in the Hamilton lowlands. The PhD project will involve (1) lake coring; (2) interpreting CT and micro-CT images of liquefaction of tephra layers in lake cores; (3) … Continue reading PhD position available with the Tephra Seismites team

Checking out Te Puninga Fault

From the week beginning 15 February, 2021, we have been taking part in a joint project investigating the newly discovered Te Puninga Fault near Morrinsville. This fault is the closest to the Hamilton Basin and so we are trying to work out if activity on the Te Puninga Fault may have impacted on Hamilton Basin, … Continue reading Checking out Te Puninga Fault

CT scanning reveals downward tephra injectites

This week we analysed the internal structure of the sediment cores we collected at Rotoroa, Rotokaeo, and Waiwhakareke using a medical CT scanner at Hamilton Radiology. This method provides a first estimation about whether or not seismites (tephras deformed by earthquake activity) are present in the sedimentary record. Next week we plan to cut the … Continue reading CT scanning reveals downward tephra injectites

Project Summary

Liquefied volcanic-ash layers (‘tephra seismites’) preserved in lake sediments have never been reported. In northern New Zealand we have identified at least four such seismites in tephra-bearing lakes aged ~20,000 years in the Hamilton Basin. Our aim is to use this unique opportunity to develop a novel methodology to evaluate the frequency, possible magnitude, and likely locations of major earthquakes for the past 20,000 years in the basin. Click here to continue